Performance Majors: Sound

During a recent lesson I had with one of my professors, we discussed the expectations that should be held for performance majors. One idea struck me as so simple but something I believe is often overlooked.

This little nugget of wisdom was as follows: the sound out of the horn should always be recording quality.

That is not to say that every note, rhythm or articulation will be spot on every time, but that the tone remains of utmost quality during practice or performance. This kind of dedication to great sound will often strengthen other weaknesses in playing.

What other expectations should be held for performance majors?

Always knew it would help me play better. ©2014doughertytuba

Always knew it would help me play better. ©2014doughertytuba

Virtue Series: Originality & Energy

“There is no art without intention. You have to play with intent to commit something.” – Duke Ellington

Originality and passion in what you do is something I feel very strongly about. We have all been told to imitate before you create, but maintaining individuality and style is what makes music so diverse and interesting. The virtue of energy in your work is imperative; be passionate about your efforts, and you will have success.

What is the point of doing something if no passion exists in it? Be it a mundane task or something more lively, if the energy is not in the product or the work, the outcome will suffer. Let your work inspire and be inspired by others.

In short, creativity is multiplied with energy and passion. Pursue new outlets or styles, and always learn, for every experience has value.

How has creativity changed your work/product?20130712-113328.jpg

Virtue Series: Teamwork/Collaboration

As the second installment in the Virtue Series, I will be focusing on the great teamwork I experienced at the Savvy Musician in Action Retreat, and how that collaboration helped me grow and lead our team to create an idea much larger than any individual ever could have developed. This virtue is one I cannot oversell; the ability to work as a member of a team and collaborate effectively is vital to career success.

Teamwork/Collaboration

As mentioned in the first Virtue post, Virtue Series, during the retreat, teams were challenged with building a functional and sustainable business model in 2 and a half days. In order to complete this task and yield a quality product, using each unique trait all six of us brought to the table was paramount. While I may be able to operate a blog, my tech skills are quite limited, while another member of the team was an IT specialist by day. With an established composer on the team, we had extensive knowledge of the market for our product, and the financial whit of a chamber ensemble leader.

Each member of the team offered a unique perspective to each problem and played a vital role in each solution. The virtue here is teamwork. Oftentimes the best solution can be reached by the most diverse group. To best summarize how effective collaboration can be done, I have included bulleted points, merely suggestions.

  • Listen to everyone, respect what they say
  • Include your thoughts, but be respectful
  • When a fork in the road is met, do not be afraid to pivot
  • All ideas are worthy of further thought
  • Delegate and do your part

The more you put into life, the more you get out.

How else can musicians collaborate with eachother? Classical, Jazz, Rock, etc?

The LinkNewMusic Team at our presentation.

The LinkNewMusic Team at our presentation.

Virtue Series

Recently, I had the fortune to attend David Cutler’s inaugural “Savvy Musician in Action” retreat where 57 musicians, entrepreneurs, and educators gathered to collaborate and learn about arts entrepreneurship. The knowledge and experience I gained are vast and will continue to influence my career.

This is the first post in a 5 part-series called Virtue Series, where I will detail the highlights of what I learned at the retreat: patience, teamwork/collaboration, originality & energy, inspiration & creativity, and networking & marketing. Each of these will be contextualized for the modern, aspiring musician. Look for each virtue to be published weekly, on Thursdays.

Patience

The core task arts entrepreneurs were faced with at the retreat was to develop a viable business model to fill a niche in the market. With only 2 days to develop, prototype, present and prove functionality of the business, teams were forced to operate rapidly. However, patience was absolutely imperative in finding the niche to be filled and how the business was to function effectively. The development of a poor idea due to impatience and hasty action is finite.

This virtue is true for all musicians, not just entrepreneurs. Patience and persistence in the practice room yields positive results. I have often witnessed that the jump in progress comes just after I nearly lose my patience. Next time you find yourself at your whit’s end, be patient and persist, a solution might be right around the corner.

What other benefits does patience have? How can you implement these in your career?

Preparation is the Key to Satisfaction

Prepare properly in a timely fashion, and nerves, uncertainty, and frustration can be avoided. The key to confidence, is preparation.

Embarking on an audition, jury, or performance can be very stressful, for the amateur and the elitist. The difference between those who progress and those who fall behind is the methodical practice done beforehand. The knowledge and skills gained from this type of work will yield confidence, leading to a successful performance.

Knowledgable practice and a healthy level of confidence will diminish fears, leaving you with the joy of musical satisfaction.

Taking Responsibility

“Eventually we all have to accept full and total responsibility for our actions, everything we have done, and have not done. ”
― Hubert Selby Jr., Requiem for a Dream

More important than taking credit for successes, is taking responsibility for failures, and learning from them.

In music, it is one’s own responsibility to take the tools given, listen to the lessons/masterclasses/courses, and work hard in order to have success. The lessons may be taught, and the advice given, but it is the individual’s responsibility to implement this knowledge to better him/herself and those around them.

It is our responsibility as musicians to create, perform, and teach great music for those who are not as fortunate as us.

Gotta practice somewhere

Gotta practice somewhere